This puts a smile on my face: 
 
smithsonianlibraries:

smithsonianlibraries:

Narwhals are Magic.

Now with proof!  Secrets of the narwhal’s tusk have recently been revealed in research headed by Martin Nweeia, a practicing dentist and clinical instructor at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine, who just happens to also be a member of the Vertebrate Zoology Department of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. With a team of researchers/coauthors, including Jim Mead, Vertebrate Zoology Curator Emeritus and Charlie Potter, Marine Mammals Collection Manager, Nweeia just published a paper in the journal The Anatomical Record about the discovery of neural pathways that run from the narwhal’s tusk to its brain. The arctic whale’s unicorn-like tusk acts as a sensor, specifically detecting variations in water salinity. Read more on the Smithsonian Science blog, or see the original article at Anatomical Record (You might want to head to your local library to see if they have access since it’s behind a paywall).
There are some pretty great images of narwhal’s over on the Biodiversity Heritage Library’s Flickr page, too.

This puts a smile on my face: 

 

smithsonianlibraries:

smithsonianlibraries:

Narwhals are Magic.

Now with proof!  Secrets of the narwhal’s tusk have recently been revealed in research headed by Martin Nweeia, a practicing dentist and clinical instructor at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine, who just happens to also be a member of the Vertebrate Zoology Department of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. With a team of researchers/coauthors, including Jim Mead, Vertebrate Zoology Curator Emeritus and Charlie Potter, Marine Mammals Collection Manager, Nweeia just published a paper in the journal The Anatomical Record about the discovery of neural pathways that run from the narwhal’s tusk to its brain. The arctic whale’s unicorn-like tusk acts as a sensor, specifically detecting variations in water salinity. Read more on the Smithsonian Science blog, or see the original article at Anatomical Record (You might want to head to your local library to see if they have access since it’s behind a paywall).

There are some pretty great images of narwhal’s over on the Biodiversity Heritage Library’s Flickr page, too.

(via smithsonian)

inspired by the powerful worlds of Marie Curie a print by Lisa Congdon, a past CreativeMornings/SanFrancisco speaker

inspired by the powerful worlds of Marie Curie a print by Lisa Congdon, a past CreativeMornings/SanFrancisco speaker

(Source: creativemornings)

pacegallery:

Reblogged from art21: In a new episode from the Exclusive series, artist Kiki Smith discusses the challenges and pleasures of printmaking. This episode features previously unreleased footage filmed in 2002 at the printmaking workshop, Harlan & Weaver, in New York City. Watch the full episode here: Kiki Smith: Printmaking.

Production stills from the Art21 Exclusive episode, Kiki Smith: Printmaking. Copyright Art21, Inc. 2013.

Check out Kiki Smith: Wonder, on view at Pace Gallery’s 510 West 25th Street location through March 29, 2014.

hahamagartconnect:

GUERRILLA CAMPAIGN REPLACES PARISIAN ADVERTISEMENTS WITH CLASSICAL WORKS OF ART

As if Paris didn’t already remind us every second that they are the cultural epicenter of France – Etienne Lavie might have sealed it as it’s guerrilla art CEO of culture.  In the series OMG, Who Stole My Ads?, Lavie is replacing billboards and other advertisements with classical paintings like Delacroix’s Liberty Leading the People and Renoir’s La Lecture. It makes the rush into the subway, the stroll down to the coffeehouse a cultural experience. “It’s created accessibility, proving that art doesn’t have to exist in a gallery or museum to be successful – it can be anywhere and is for everyone.”   

More on HAHA MAG...

*photos from Etienne’s site.

flavorpill:


It’s true that representation of women could always use more realism and less salad. But the Getty partnership is a single (literally) cosmetic fix for about seven different structural issues. 

Lean In’s Stock Image Campaign Does More for Sheryl Sandberg’s Critics Than the Feminist Cause

“The larger problem is that the majority of art directors and the majority of photographers are men,” she explains. “I read in Fast Company that only 3 percent of creative directors are women….”

flavorpill:

It’s true that representation of women could always use more realism and less salad. But the Getty partnership is a single (literally) cosmetic fix for about seven different structural issues. 

Lean In’s Stock Image Campaign Does More for Sheryl Sandberg’s Critics Than the Feminist Cause

“The larger problem is that the majority of art directors and the majority of photographers are men,” she explains. “I read in Fast Company that only 3 percent of creative directors are women….”

artingeneral:

In anticipation of Art in General and the Museum for African Art’s upcoming public program What Now?: Spaces of Contradiction (more information here), we’ve excerpted an interview between NY-based art critic and curator Joshua Decter and Chelsea Haines of Guernica Magazine, regarding his new collection of essays Art is a Problem.
Guernica: How did you arrive at the book’s title?
Joshua Decter: It took some time. But upon arrival, it seemed the most effective means of embodying my longstanding ambivalence about art, criticality, and other matters in a humorous, plaintive, and hopefully serious manner. I think many people have, and continue to, harbor doubts about whether art is a useful vehicle to engage with, or engender change within, broader political, economic, social, and ideological conditions, even as we struggle to reconcile this doubt with commitment and optimism. Art engenders important problems, yet it is also a problem. So why not be a bit provocative, and deploy a title that might startle some readers.
Guernica: You started your career as a critic and curator around the same time as a massive rise in interest in the relationship between art and politics. How do you see this shift being indicated in your writing over time?
Joshua Decter: I grew up resolutely middle class in Manhattan and was taken to museums and galleries by my parents, so art was always a part of my life. After college, I participated in the curatorial/critical studies component of the Whitney Independent Study Program (ISP) from 1984 to 1985, where I met artists such as Andrea Fraser, Mark Dion, and Glenn Ligon. There I engaged in a year-long one-on-one theory tutorial with Benjamin Buchloh—experiences that drove home the point that one cannot think about art outside of its embedded relationship within larger systems. And the ’80s were actually a rather contradictory period in New York, [there was] a significant expansion of venues and markets for contemporary art, as well as the emergence of various forms of art and cultural activism and politically-engaged practices. There are some relevant parallels to today’s situation. When my art criticism first started being published in the mid-’80s, part of me wanted to tear down the idols of art history, while another part maintained faith in—the illusion?—that art could be oppositional in some way.
These illusions began to fade a bit while working in my first curatorial job at an institution, PS1, in the late ’80s. A few years later, in the early ’90s, I became increasingly uncomfortable with how the work of the aforementioned generation of Institutional Critique artists—my friends and peers—seemed to have become at home within the institutions under critique. The bogeyman became the sugar daddy. These contradictions bothered me. Still do to a certain extent. So in a way, my problem with art is just how smoothly critique has been assimilated within museums and other cultural institutions. And now, how institutions have evolved into contradictory platforms. I’m conflicted, since I still want art to put pressure on conditions of economic, social, and political injustice, yet unsure about what results from that pressure. And this is not merely a theoretical dilemma—it’s also an existential question about one’s work and position in relationship to the field.
 
For a link to the full interview, please click here
More information on Decter’s book, Art is a Problem, can be found on Artbook, Amazon, and Guernica Magazine.

artingeneral:

In anticipation of Art in General and the Museum for African Art’s upcoming public program What Now?: Spaces of Contradiction (more information here), we’ve excerpted an interview between NY-based art critic and curator Joshua Decter and Chelsea Haines of Guernica Magazine, regarding his new collection of essays Art is a Problem.

Guernica: How did you arrive at the book’s title?

Joshua Decter: It took some time. But upon arrival, it seemed the most effective means of embodying my longstanding ambivalence about art, criticality, and other matters in a humorous, plaintive, and hopefully serious manner. I think many people have, and continue to, harbor doubts about whether art is a useful vehicle to engage with, or engender change within, broader political, economic, social, and ideological conditions, even as we struggle to reconcile this doubt with commitment and optimism. Art engenders important problems, yet it is also a problem. So why not be a bit provocative, and deploy a title that might startle some readers.

Guernica: You started your career as a critic and curator around the same time as a massive rise in interest in the relationship between art and politics. How do you see this shift being indicated in your writing over time?

Joshua Decter: I grew up resolutely middle class in Manhattan and was taken to museums and galleries by my parents, so art was always a part of my life. After college, I participated in the curatorial/critical studies component of the Whitney Independent Study Program (ISP) from 1984 to 1985, where I met artists such as Andrea Fraser, Mark Dion, and Glenn Ligon. There I engaged in a year-long one-on-one theory tutorial with Benjamin Buchloh—experiences that drove home the point that one cannot think about art outside of its embedded relationship within larger systems. And the ’80s were actually a rather contradictory period in New York, [there was] a significant expansion of venues and markets for contemporary art, as well as the emergence of various forms of art and cultural activism and politically-engaged practices. There are some relevant parallels to today’s situation. When my art criticism first started being published in the mid-’80s, part of me wanted to tear down the idols of art history, while another part maintained faith in—the illusion?—that art could be oppositional in some way.

These illusions began to fade a bit while working in my first curatorial job at an institution, PS1, in the late ’80s. A few years later, in the early ’90s, I became increasingly uncomfortable with how the work of the aforementioned generation of Institutional Critique artists—my friends and peers—seemed to have become at home within the institutions under critique. The bogeyman became the sugar daddy. These contradictions bothered me. Still do to a certain extent. So in a way, my problem with art is just how smoothly critique has been assimilated within museums and other cultural institutions. And now, how institutions have evolved into contradictory platforms. I’m conflicted, since I still want art to put pressure on conditions of economic, social, and political injustice, yet unsure about what results from that pressure. And this is not merely a theoretical dilemma—it’s also an existential question about one’s work and position in relationship to the field.

 

For a link to the full interview, please click here

More information on Decter’s book, Art is a Problem, can be found on Artbook, Amazon, and Guernica Magazine.

jjohnsonagency:

Pilar Mehlis: Mythical Reality, Magical Realism

In Pilar Mehlis’s paintings, it wouldn’t be unusual to find a figure in a classical contrapposto stance, snake underfoot, wearing an unassuming modern housecoat.  And it’s her rendering of this contradiction, this co-inhabitance of mythological and classical symbolism and the modern mundane, which makes her so brilliant.  With influences from such culturally varying cities as Manhattan, NYC (her birthplace), La Paz, Bolivia (where she grew up), Whitehorse, Yukon (where she had her first painting lessons) and Victoria, BC (where she achieved her BFA), Pilar creates visually rich canvases that compare and question modern developmental challenges, both collective and personal.

In her use of mythological symbolism and allegory, Pilar often turns to the animal world: a human couple with fish heads, gills flared, gasps for literal and figurative breath in “Love with Lungs and Gills”; a determined wildebeest leaps to greatness over a tentative crowd in “Leap Variation I”.   Animals or human-animal hybrids are used to reveal hidden facts, feelings and emotions.  Blindness also tends to feature strongly: subjects are blinded through excess, ignorance, circumstance.  Pilar’s subjects are further embellished by her adept skill at realism, a hallmark of her work: whatever animal, human, or part thereof is pictured, however small or large, however real or imaginary, is always rendered with fantastic anatomical attention.

Ultimately, to enter the visual world of Pilar Mehlis is to distinguish and understand layered realities, and to recognize the complicated psychological components in the universal struggle to be better.  Perhaps it could also lead one to sprout eagle’s wings or an elephant’s trunk… which, in Pilar’s world, would no doubt be in the service of a meaningful purpose.

-Alia Tracy for JJA

Learn more about Pilar Mehlis and her paintings www.pilarmehlis.ca

(via jjohnsonagency)

contemporaryartdaily:

Kerry James Marshall at M HKA

jjohnsonagency:

Pilar Mehlis: Mythical Reality, Magical Realism

In Pilar Mehlis’s paintings, it wouldn’t be unusual to find a figure in a classical contrapposto stance, snake underfoot, wearing an unassuming modern housecoat.  And it’s her rendering of this contradiction, this co-inhabitance of mythological and classical symbolism and the modern mundane, which makes her so brilliant.  With influences from such culturally varying cities as Manhattan, NYC (her birthplace), La Paz, Bolivia (where she grew up), Whitehorse, Yukon (where she had her first painting lessons) and Victoria, BC (where she achieved her BFA), Pilar creates visually rich canvases that compare and question modern developmental challenges, both collective and personal.

In her use of mythological symbolism and allegory, Pilar often turns to the animal world: a human couple with fish heads, gills flared, gasps for literal and figurative breath in “Love with Lungs and Gills”; a determined wildebeest leaps to greatness over a tentative crowd in “Leap Variation I”.   Animals or human-animal hybrids are used to reveal hidden facts, feelings and emotions.  Blindness also tends to feature strongly: subjects are blinded through excess, ignorance, circumstance.  Pilar’s subjects are further embellished by her adept skill at realism, a hallmark of her work: whatever animal, human, or part thereof is pictured, however small or large, however real or imaginary, is always rendered with fantastic anatomical attention.

Ultimately, to enter the visual world of Pilar Mehlis is to distinguish and understand layered realities, and to recognize the complicated psychological components in the universal struggle to be better.  Perhaps it could also lead one to sprout eagle’s wings or an elephant’s trunk… which, in Pilar’s world, would no doubt be in the service of a meaningful purpose.

-Alia Tracy for JJA

Learn more about Pilar Mehlis and her paintings www.pilarmehlis.ca