paddle8:


Blanca Miro’s Space of Life, (2014) included in our auction for RECON.

paddle8:

Blanca Miro’s Space of Life, (2014) included in our auction for RECON.

Enjoyed a studio visit with Vancouver-based painter Brent Boechler at uber cool Parker Studios.

Currently represented by the Bau-Xi Gallery (Bau-Xi.com) and gearing up for his fall show.

Boechler’s interest in abstraction is played out through undulating forms, suggestive of figures and ethereal, moody colourscapes. His paintings can be found in numerous private and corporate collections worldwide.

fyeahwomenartists:

Currently on our wishlist…
Women Artists: Works from the National Museum of Women in the Arts
Available here & here. 

fyeahwomenartists:

Currently on our wishlist…

Women Artists: Works from the National Museum of Women in the Arts

Available here & here

Love seeing photography merge with design to create playful objects for the home. Check out these amazingly cool pillows from Vancouver-based company Pillow Fight.

www.pillowfightfactory.com

"We believe treasured pillows are an extension of ones style.
Our first collection, The Graffiti Series was Inspired by pictures taken by chance and luck over the past couple years around beautiful British Columbia.”

The Herbarium Project Exhibition Opening

Thursday, May 15, 2014  |  7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.



About the Exhibition

The Herbarium ProjectMay 15 – August 24, 2014

Artist Karen Yurkovich explores our complex and variegated relationship with nature. Using specimens from the UBC Herbarium (a part of the Beaty Biodiversity Museum collections) she re-examines these taxonomically organized pieces of nature through their aesthetics, their symbolism, their mythologies and their histories. Recognizing and celebrating the ubiquity with which nature is integrated into our culture and daily lives, these paintings encourage us to move beyond a functional relationship with nature and to build a stronger emotional bond – to view nature not as a resource, but as a source of cultural, emotional and aesthetic value. 

Alongside the paintings will be displayed some of the original Herbarium specimens, as well as the artist’s research materials, providing a unique insight into Yurkovich’s artistic process. 


BiographyKaren Yurkovich is a Canadian artist working between Vancouver and Florence, Italy. She centres her practice on nature and the ways in which it manifests in the thoughts and concepts within society and culture. Her work explores themes such as native and immigrant plants, bonsai, classical still lifes of the 16th century, GMOs, ancient cultivars and cultivation, the use of plants in medicine and culinary practices, issues of biodiversity, and the symbolic role of plants within different cultures.
Yurkovich’s work has been shown extensively and can be found in both private and public collections including the Bill Gates Foundation, Unicredit Bank, Italy, Alberta Foundation for the Arts, and the Cy and Lissa Wagner Collection, Texas. 

She currently directs and teaches in the MFA program at Studio Art Centers International, Florence and continues to teach at Emily Carr University in Vancouver.  
The Herbarium Project Exhibition Opening
Thursday, May 15, 2014  |  7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
About the Exhibition
The Herbarium Project
May 15 – August 24, 2014
Artist Karen Yurkovich explores our complex and variegated relationship with nature. Using specimens from the UBC Herbarium (a part of the Beaty Biodiversity Museum collections) she re-examines these taxonomically organized pieces of nature through their aesthetics, their symbolism, their mythologies and their histories. Recognizing and celebrating the ubiquity with which nature is integrated into our culture and daily lives, these paintings encourage us to move beyond a functional relationship with nature and to build a stronger emotional bond – to view nature not as a resource, but as a source of cultural, emotional and aesthetic value. 
Alongside the paintings will be displayed some of the original Herbarium specimens, as well as the artist’s research materials, providing a unique insight into Yurkovich’s artistic process. 
Biography

Karen Yurkovich is a Canadian artist working between Vancouver and Florence, Italy. She centres her practice on nature and the ways in which it manifests in the thoughts and concepts within society and culture. Her work explores themes such as native and immigrant plants, bonsai, classical still lifes of the 16th century, GMOs, ancient cultivars and cultivation, the use of plants in medicine and culinary practices, issues of biodiversity, and the symbolic role of plants within different cultures.
Yurkovich’s work has been shown extensively and can be found in both private and public collections including the Bill Gates Foundation, Unicredit Bank, Italy, Alberta Foundation for the Arts, and the Cy and Lissa Wagner Collection, Texas. 
She currently directs and teaches in the MFA program at Studio Art Centers International, Florence and continues to teach at Emily Carr University in Vancouver.  

nycartscene:

just opened:

The Invocation
 Gehard Demetz

Jack Shainman Gallery, 513 W20th St., NYC

Demetz continues his exploration of contemporary issues through the traditional practice of woodcarving. With impeccable craftsmanship, Demetz builds figures and reliefs of children and rural, often religious, architectural forms. While his subjects often take the forms of adolescent or very young children who are at the precipice of self-realization, their grave expressions and powerful stances suggest something much less innocent than their ages might suggest. - thru May 31


"Christopher Gaze playing ‘Bottom’ in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The 24 Hour Shakespeare Project."


The 24 Hour Shakespeare Project rang in Shakespeare’s 450th birthday last week with many of Vancouver’s finest performers, including Christopher Gaze (Bard on the Beach), Brendan Meyer (Mr. Young), Nicole Munoz (Defiance), Alessandro Juliani (Battlestar Galactica, Bard on the Beach), journalist/playwright/performer Mark Leiren-Young and the event’s creator John Emmet Tracy (Supernatural, American Mary).  The marathon staged-reading performance of all 38 of Shakespeare’s plays raised over $10,500 for BC Children’s Hospital Foundation.  The Bard himself would be proud.


THE 24 HOUR SHAKESPEARE PROJECT
All 38 Plays.  24 Hours.  One Vital Cause. 
Donate:www.24hourshakespeareproject.com
www.facebook.com/24HourShakespeareProject
Twitter.com/24HrShakespeare

"Christopher Gaze playing ‘Bottom’ in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The 24 Hour Shakespeare Project."

The 24 Hour Shakespeare Project rang in Shakespeare’s 450th birthday last week with many of Vancouver’s finest performers, including Christopher Gaze (Bard on the Beach), Brendan Meyer (Mr. Young), Nicole Munoz (Defiance), Alessandro Juliani (Battlestar Galactica, Bard on the Beach), journalist/playwright/performer Mark Leiren-Young and the event’s creator John Emmet Tracy (Supernatural, American Mary).  The marathon staged-reading performance of all 38 of Shakespeare’s plays raised over $10,500 for BC Children’s Hospital Foundation.  The Bard himself would be proud.

THE 24 HOUR SHAKESPEARE PROJECT

All 38 Plays.  24 Hours.  One Vital Cause. 

Donate:www.24hourshakespeareproject.com

www.facebook.com/24HourShakespeareProject

Twitter.com/24HrShakespeare

A most creative way to support a very important cause.  Please consider attending or donating to The 24 Hour Shakespeare Project, a 24 hour staged reading performance of all of Shakespeare’s 38 plays to benefit BC Children’s Hospital Foundation, April 23:www.24hourshakespeareproject.com

— 


THE 24 HOUR SHAKESPEARE PROJECT
All 38 Plays.  24 Hours.  One Vital Cause. 
Donate:www.24hourshakespeareproject.com

www.facebook.com/24HourShakespeareProject
Twitter.com/24HrShakespeare
www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9K6_cnzSTA
A most creative way to support a very important cause.  Please consider attending or donating to The 24 Hour Shakespeare Project, a 24 hour staged reading performance of all of Shakespeare’s 38 plays to benefit BC Children’s Hospital Foundation, April 23:www.24hourshakespeareproject.com
— 

THE 24 HOUR SHAKESPEARE PROJECT
All 38 Plays.  24 Hours.  One Vital Cause. 

contemporaryartdaily:

Emily Sundblad at House of Gaga

Welcome to Week in Review, our Sunday round-up of the last seven days of activity here at Contemporary Art Daily. Please subscribe to our RSS feed, follow us on Twitter, follow us on Tumblr, and become a fan on Facebook.

We would like to extend a special thank you to our…

This puts a smile on my face: 
 
smithsonianlibraries:

smithsonianlibraries:

Narwhals are Magic.

Now with proof!  Secrets of the narwhal’s tusk have recently been revealed in research headed by Martin Nweeia, a practicing dentist and clinical instructor at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine, who just happens to also be a member of the Vertebrate Zoology Department of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. With a team of researchers/coauthors, including Jim Mead, Vertebrate Zoology Curator Emeritus and Charlie Potter, Marine Mammals Collection Manager, Nweeia just published a paper in the journal The Anatomical Record about the discovery of neural pathways that run from the narwhal’s tusk to its brain. The arctic whale’s unicorn-like tusk acts as a sensor, specifically detecting variations in water salinity. Read more on the Smithsonian Science blog, or see the original article at Anatomical Record (You might want to head to your local library to see if they have access since it’s behind a paywall).
There are some pretty great images of narwhal’s over on the Biodiversity Heritage Library’s Flickr page, too.

This puts a smile on my face: 

 

smithsonianlibraries:

smithsonianlibraries:

Narwhals are Magic.

Now with proof!  Secrets of the narwhal’s tusk have recently been revealed in research headed by Martin Nweeia, a practicing dentist and clinical instructor at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine, who just happens to also be a member of the Vertebrate Zoology Department of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. With a team of researchers/coauthors, including Jim Mead, Vertebrate Zoology Curator Emeritus and Charlie Potter, Marine Mammals Collection Manager, Nweeia just published a paper in the journal The Anatomical Record about the discovery of neural pathways that run from the narwhal’s tusk to its brain. The arctic whale’s unicorn-like tusk acts as a sensor, specifically detecting variations in water salinity. Read more on the Smithsonian Science blog, or see the original article at Anatomical Record (You might want to head to your local library to see if they have access since it’s behind a paywall).

There are some pretty great images of narwhal’s over on the Biodiversity Heritage Library’s Flickr page, too.

(via smithsonian)